Business and Home

Taylor K. Vecsey
When Ben and Bonnie Krupinski died in a plane crash last month, along with their grandson and the pilot, East Hampton mourned the passing of a couple who had been so generous to the community. Their sudden loss shocked employees at Mr. Krupinski’s many enterprises and they were determined to carry on his legacy.
FAMILY FUN
Jack Graves
It’s been a while coming, two and a half years in fact, but the Clubhouse, the massive pleasure palace annexed to East Hampton Indoor Tennis’s six indoor courts officially opens today, at 11 a.m. to be precise.
Star Staff
The prices below have been calculated from the county transfer tax. Unless otherwise noted, the parcels contain structures. Data provided by Suffolk Research Service of Southampton.
Star Staff
Local Business Notes
Star Staff
The prices below have been calculated from the county transfer tax. Unless otherwise noted, the parcels contain structures. Data provided by Suffolk Research Service of Southampton.
Judy D’Mello
More than a decade before Jason Biondo was born, Macy’s, the department store, and Raymond Loewy, the prolific industrial designer, commissioned the renowned architect Andrew Geller to design about 200 prefabricated houses for Culloden Point, a peninsula less than three miles from Montauk’s downtown. It was 1963, and the Leisurama homes, as they were called, cost between $13,000 and $17,000.
Photos by Durell Godfrey
More than a decade before Jason Biondo was born, Macy’s, the department store, and Raymond Loewy, the prolific industrial designer, commissioned the renowned architect Andrew Geller to design about 200 prefabricated houses for Culloden Point, a peninsula less than three miles from Montauk’s downtown. It was 1963, and the Leisurama homes, as they were called, cost between $13,000 and $17,000.
Jamie Bufalino
Two years ago, when the old Federal-Italianate residence at 6 Union Street in Sag Harbor finally escaped the years-long grip of bank foreclosures and landed in the hands of real estate developers, it was in a state of near collapse. Its windows were boarded, the front porch was in danger of caving in, and there was a hole in the roof of an addition at the back. The building, which is thought to date to the 1760s, has long been called the Morpurgo house, named for Annselm and Helga Morpurgo, the sisters who had lived in it, fought over it, and let it disintegrate over decades.
Photos by Durell Godfrey
Two years ago, when the old Federal-Italianate residence at 6 Union Street in Sag Harbor finally escaped the years-long grip of bank foreclosures and landed in the hands of real estate developers, it was in a state of near collapse. Its windows were boarded, the front porch was in danger of caving in, and there was a hole in the roof of an addition at the back. The building, which is thought to date to the 1760s, has long been called the Morpurgo house, named for Annselm and Helga Morpurgo, the sisters who had lived in it, fought over it, and let it disintegrate over decades.
Isabel Carmichael
What she could possibly give her husband as a 25th wedding anniversary present was on Yusi Gurrera’s mind about a year and a half ago when she came up with a perfect solution. She would ask a friend who is a sculptor, James Grashow, who lives in Connecticut, to create something that would epitomize her husband’s main interest — fish.
Photos by Durell Godfrey
What she could possibly give her husband as a 25th wedding anniversary present was on Yusi Gurrera’s mind about a year and a half ago when she came up with a perfect solution. She would ask a friend who is a sculptor, James Grashow, who lives in Connecticut, to create something that would epitomize her husband’s main interest — fish.
Star Staff
Local Business Notes
Star Staff
The prices below have been calculated from the county transfer tax. Unless otherwise noted, the parcels contain structures. Data provided by Suffolk Research Service of Southampton.
Jamie Bufalino
“That poor house, why doesn’t somebody buy it and fix it up?” That’s what Jennifer Georges kept thinking as she passed a small, two-story structure on Newtown Lane in East Hampton Village during the waning days of 2014. The only single-family house in the commercial corridor, it had been on the real estate market for years and was deteriorating.
Alex Lemonides
In its first summer, the Montauk Brewing Company sold about 535 barrels of beer to 17 restaurants, delivering the kegs by bicycle. Six years later, the company, founded by Montauk natives Eric Moss, Joe Sullivan, and Vaughn Cutillo, expects to sell about 40,000 barrels in hundreds of establishments.