Business and Home

Taylor K. Vecsey
A fire rendered the Safelite AutoGlass building in Bridgehampton unusable for now, but it has not stopped business.
Judy D’Mello
Andrew Geller’s uninhibited, angular houses of the 1950s and 1960s were cut from a playful mold. He was known as “the architect of happiness,” having designed the prefabricated Leisurama houses marketed for middle-income families by Macy’s, which came fully furnished. For as little as $590 down and $73 a month — or somewhat more if you splurged — you could take your toothbrush, buy groceries, and enjoy the summer, even at Montauk, where some 200 were built. To his detractors, Geller was an outsider, but it was a concept he relished.
Judy D’Mello
“It was so special — a three-story house,” Viola Rouhani, the architect of what became the Treehouse in Amagansett, said. “We knew we had to preserve it and have it grandfathered in to keep that view.”
Star Staff
The 1894 oil painting above, by Mary Nimmo Moran, is an imaginative rendering of a long garden she planted along the south border of the Moran House property on East Hampton’s Main Street, where she and her husband, the painter Thomas Moran, lived in the late 19th century.
Mark Segal
From Kips Bay to Pasadena, designer show houses across the country afford opportunities for interior designers to display their talents while at the same time raising money for a wide range of charitable causes.
Star Staff
The prices below have been calculated from the county transfer tax. Unless otherwise noted, the parcels contain structures.
Photos by Durell Godfrey
It was the 1980s. America had an actor for a president, and in Japan the wartime emperor-god had morphed into a mild-mannered marine biologist. President Reagan promised it was “morning in America,” but the economic sun was really rising in the Far East. Japan enjoyed a booming economy, lifetime employment, and plenty of money. Sushi was routinely sprinkled with gold leaf, and a corner of land in Tokyo’s Ginza district was worth more than all of California.
Carissa Katz
In a dining room full of East Hampton employers, about six raised their hands when asked at an East Hampton Business Alliance breakfast last Thursday if they use the H-2B visa program to bring in seasonal foreign workers.
Star Staff
The prices below have been calculated from the county transfer tax. Unless otherwise noted, the parcels contain structures.
Star Staff
The prices below have been calculated from the county transfer tax. Unless otherwise noted, the parcels contain structures.
Star Staff
Blumenfeld + Fleming, a Montauk marketing and design firm, racked up 14 awards in the 2017 Hermes Creative Awards Competition.
Star Staff
The prices below have been calculated from the county transfer tax. Unless otherwise noted, the parcels contain structures.
Star Staff
The prices below have been calculated from the county transfer tax. Unless otherwise noted, the parcels contain structures.
The prices below have been calculated from the county transfer tax. Unless otherwise noted, the parcels contain structures.
Mark Segal
What might be called a museum of outsider art, hidden on Hog Creek Road in Springs, was once a dairy barn, an Abstract Expressionist’s studio, and the original home of the Springs Fire Department. The monument is easy to miss.