Arts

Mark Segal
The pop-up gallery for ArtUnprimed in the Addo shop in Sag Harbor is now showing “Terra,” a group exhibition inspired by nature. “Art That Speaks to You,” a group show featuring work by Mark E. Zimmerman and Kat O’Neill, will open tomorrow at the White Room Gallery in Bridgehampton and continue through April 3. A reception will take place Saturday from 5 to 7 p.m.
Star Staff
The Perlman Music Program will present a solo violin recital by Francesca Anderegg, an alumna of the program, on Saturday afternoon at 5 at the Clark Arts Center on Shelter Island. Ms. Anderegg, who will be accompanied on piano by John Root, will perform classic and contemporary works by Mozart, Hannah Lash, Clint Needham, Manuel de Falla, and Maurice Ravel. Tickets are $25, free for students.
Christopher Walsh
“Inter-Sections: The Architect in Conversation,” a new series exploring architecture in multiple contexts, will launch tomorrow at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill with “The Art of Architecture,” featuring Preston Scott Cohen in conversation with Terrie Sultan, the museum’s director.
Star Staff
Nimbus Productions will present “A Steady Rain,” a play starring Edward Kassar and Joe Pallister, beginning next Thursday and running through March 19 at Guild Hall. Jenna Mate is directing.
Opinion
Jennifer Landes
It has certainly been a busy winter. Although some art galleries have closed or cut back hours, others are popping up like expensive boutiques in the summer.
Star Staff
“Promises, Promises,” a 1968 musical based on “The Apartment,” a 1960 film about a company man whose pied-a-terre on the Upper East Side is a love shack for his bosses, will open at the Southampton Cultural Center next Thursday and run through March 26. It will be staged as a concert.
Star Staff
Guild Hall’s weekend will include two screenings of substantial film and theater offerings. It begins tomorrow with the Hamptons International Film Festival’s 25th anniversary screening of “I Am Not Your Negro,” from October’s festival. The film is a meditation on James Baldwin’s unfinished manuscript “Remember This House,” which explored the lives and murders of his friends Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.
Dava Sobel’s “The Glass Universe” is studded with stories of remarkable women, one of whom went from household maid to the Harvard College Observatory's curator of astronomical photographs, going on to document more than 10,000 stars.
Star Staff
On Saturday afternoon, the Watermill Center will present the latest open-rehearsal performance of its resident artist group Bruno Guida and P.L.U.T.O., an ensemble of stage directors, actors, and writers formed in 2015 at Lincoln Center’s Directors Lab. The performance, “Black Box,” examines the group’s various backgrounds and cultures.
Star Staff
Montauk will be the site on Saturday of this year’s ZIMA!, a theatrical scavenger hunt. For several years Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls have used different sites on the South Fork to mount a midwinter interactive theatrical journey to collect clues and solve a riddle
Star Staff
Feeling a little bit country? A little bit rock ’n’ roll? There’s no need to feel mixed-up: The Zac Brown Tribute Band understands.
Star Staff
The Old Whalers Church in Sag Harbor will host ACCORD, a professional women’s choir from New York, as part of its Bach, Before, and Beyond series on Sunday at 3 p.m.
Jennifer Landes
Works by John Ashbery, Rudy Burckhardt, and Larry Rivers, three artists with long associations with the South Fork, are included in a group show at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery in Manhattan. Erica-Lynn Huberty will display an installation of her artwork and read from her Sag Harbor-based novella, “Watchwork: A Tale in Time,” tonight at 6 in the Malia Mills pop-up gallery space in East Hampton.
Star Staff
The faculty musicians of International Music Sessions, a bicoastal music education program that encourages multicultural interaction through the arts, will have a concert at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in East Hampton on Saturday at 5 p.m.
Jennifer Landes
Playing a psychiatrist in David Mamet's new play, “The Penitent,” Chris Bauer must wrestle with religion, the press, and the legal system as well as "the athletic technical demands" of the play.