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Articles by this author:

  • There were some decent reports of cod a week earlier, but the ever-present black sea bass could be a problem. While they are widely proclaimed to be one of the tastiest fish, sadly, we would not be able retain any, as the season for them in Rhode Island and federal waters (more than three miles offshore) remains closed until this coming Sunday.
  • Blackfish, or tautog or tog as they are also commonly referred to, will not win many underwater beauty contests. Compared to other fish like the exalted and highly prized striped bass, they’re just not the prettiest to admire from up close or from afar.
  • Those of us here on eastern Long Island are fortunate that we have not experienced a direct hit from a storm thus far. While we are finally past the peak of hurricane season in the Atlantic basin, we still have another two months to keep our guard up. May our good fortunes continue.
  • For those with a competitive spirit, the fall season is prime time in Montauk to take part in a number of fishing contests, especially if you are one to ply your skills from the beach.
  • If you are a fan of catching black sea bass, you have certainly been spoiled for a number of years by the increasingly large biomass of the fish. It seems they are everywhere, and now they are showing up in locations never seen before.
  • Our "On the Water" columnist enters the clam-shucking contest at Harborfest in Sag Harbor. At left, Peter Ambrose, top shucker.
  • While the calendar says it’s still summer for a few more weeks, the passing of Labor Day and Tumbleweed Tuesday always seems to trigger an inner emotion that’s sometimes a bit hard to capture and describe.
  • As the owner of the Tackle Shop in Amagansett for nearly 40 years, Harvey Bennett has probably seen just about everything that could happen on the water.
  • It took a long time to complete. Almost 15 years. But for the East Hamptoner Paul Annacone, finishing and publishing his first book was a lifelong accomplishment.
  • Meteorologists and their forecasts will always get a bad rap. That will probably never change. However, I usually get a bit of a chuckle when Colorado State University puts out its annual forecast for the Atlantic Basin hurricane season.